Silk Painting With Lola Fonseca – A Master In Madrid

Silk Painting With Lola Fonseca – A Master In Madrid


silk painting

After what seems like years, actually it really was years.., of not travelling, I had the fortune to visit Madrid again this summer. My daughter now lives there where she is attending university. Unfortunately, I only had a couple days there and didn’t get a chance to try to track down my old friend Lola Fonseca.

I really hope she is still going. Her studio was wonderful. Sadly, however, Madrid and Spain overall were pretty badly affected by the events of the last few years and many small businesses like Lola’s have simply disappeared.

I decided to republish this article from a couple of years ago since most readers probably haven’t seen it.  If any of our readers are going to be in Madrid in the near future and have the time, could you please let us know how Lola’s going? I really hope you enjoy this article.  I’ll have some other updates from Spain, Paris, and a few other wonderful locations in the coming weeks.


Last summer, my family and I took a much-anticipated trip to Spain.  I had not been back to Spain in more than 15 years.  As you can imagine, my memories of Madrid revolve around leather, fabric, lace, and heavily embroidered shawls and are still very much intact in my mind.

Growing up in Panama, we valued anything coming from the “Mother Land” — Spain.  It gave you a sort of distinction among your peers even if it was only a tourist trinket from some street market.

So Spain holds many important memories for me.  Not the least of which is of my grandmother who was born in Spain.

silk painting

I have many memories of my grandmother.  She always tied her hair back and usually draped a colorful shawl across her shoulders.  She said the shawl came from Spain.  I can still close my eyes and recreate every single stitch of that shawl in my mind. The embroidered roses and the long fringes falling down all the way past her hips.  She was such a lovely lady. She was born in Cadaqués, Spain and married young, to a Colombian.  Together they raised five children of their own and helped fifteen other adopted children reach adulthood.  Her shawl had been passed down from her mother, and in turn, she passed it down to my mother.

So while in Madrid, I was in search of something similar, driven by nostalgia mostly, but what I found was something truly unique.  Lola Fonseca… Perfect name, perfect studio, vibrant, colorful and made of silk!!!! Actually, I did not find it, it was my husband who had spotted it and knowing me well told me about it and encouraged me to go in.

silk painting

Silk was everywhere and in bold colors. All over the walls and tables were huge scarves that could be worn even as sarongs.  This seemed to be a magical oasis of textile arts hidden away on a beautiful side street.

Silk Painting with Lola Fonseca

The art of silk painting was first recorded in China and goes back more than 2000 years.  So it was refreshing to find someone dedicating their life to mastering this lovely art here in Madrid.

The center of the shop held the best part. It was where Lola did her silk painting.  I had never seen silk painting before in person, I had only seen the beautiful results of this wonderful craft.

silk painting
Photo credit: Lola Fonseca

Watching her move the brush across the silk with such ease inspired me to try it out.

silk painting
A work in progress…Lola Fonseca

Making My First Silk Scarf

Lola was very friendly and eager to teach me some of her skills. She started by teaching me how to stretch the scarf on the loom.

silk painting

Once the scarf was stretched she instructed me on to apply a resin so that the paint does not run out to the edge.

In other words, we are framing the work with a water/paint resistant resin to ensure that the paint is contained to where I want it to be.

After we draw the frame it is time to apply the base coat.  I am thinking I want to wear this silk scarf with a little black dress so I will choose some colors to match.

Unsurprisingly, I discovered that silk painting was not as easy as Lola made it look. I quickly realized that you need to move the brush rather fast and without hesitation, so the color does not pool.  You can see below that this happened to me.  It really takes a lot of confidence to paint boldly and smoothly with such a delicate material.

While the base coat is drying I took the opportunity to chat with Lola.  Her scarfs have been selling for over 20 years.  Today her son Claudio  handles most of the general production since these scarves are exported to all over the world.  Of course, she continues to create her own work and sells her personal creations to interested individuals.

Back to the painting, next I painted the frame with black.  I made a little mistake and had to draw something in there to disguise it.  As I mentioned before this craft is not easy, but boy is it rewarding! I was just happy to be there spending the time with Lola and learning this unique technique.

I kept my design pretty simple because I wanted it to be ready for me to take home the same day.  I chose a traditional pattern of flowers and branches.  Like all crafts, a simple design that is well executed is always better than a complicated one executed poorly.  It is important to keep this in mind when learning any new skill, as learning the basics well will set you up for success and further growth.

Lola then showed me a technique for making petals with one brush stroke, but my brush skills were out of practice and I found it a little difficult…

Painting the branches was a lot easier, it was just a matter of positioning them in a balanced way.  Adding a few buds here and there gave the plant some more substance.

To finish the flowers I used some yellow-gold paint dripped onto their center.  I also used the yellow to highlight the brighter petals.

When I finished, Lola told me to sign the scarf.  I realized that Lola and I have much more in common than I would have thought, we both love textiles (as well as romantic movies 🙂  There is no place where I would rather be than right here in this happy studio.

via GIPHY

If you like paint bottles, brushes, and silk, plus the perfect amount of light filtering in and the sounds of steps from the pedestrian street out front — I recommend a visit to this studio.  If you would like to feel the Bohemian vibe of it in the middle of one the most exciting cities in Europe, chatting, painting and drinking coffee… why don’t you come by?

You can find Lola’s Studio in –> Calle Cervantes 20, Madrid.

silk painting
silk painting

Call ahead to book an appointment or drop by to purchase one of her exquisite designs.

tel:+34 913 69 15 43

If you happened to see Lola this summer say hello and give her two kisses on the cheeks from me.

Update:  Today this lovely studio is directed by Lola’s son who is just as talented as his mother.

silk painting
silk painting

Photo Credit:   Claudio Mendez Fonseca 

Until Next Time! Happy Sewing!


If You’d Like To Support Our Site

If you want to help us continue to bring you a wide selection of free sewing patterns and projects, please consider buying us a coffee.  We’d really, really appreciate it.




Source link

12 Essential Tips for Zero Waste Sewing

12 Essential Tips for Zero Waste Sewing


Recently we created a list of zero-waste sewing projects that was very well received by our readers.  A few people asked for more tips on how to go zero-waste, so we put this list together.

12 Essential Tips For Zero Waste Sewing

People sew for a variety of reasons.  Some do so out of need and some do so simply out of interest. But whether it’s fixing your worn-out clothes, creating new ones, or altering a piece that doesn’t quite fit, we can all agree that reducing your sewing waste is great for both your wallet and the environment.

To follow these tips there are only a few things needed for starters: some needles, a variety of threads, and a pair of scissors.  Here’s a short list of Essential Sewing Tools for Beginners that you might find helpful.

Sewing helps each of us in many different ways. Learning the most basic of it can save us in certain situations. Whatever reason you may have for starting to sew, you should keep in mind that you can finish your sewing tasks quickly when you have only a small or large amount of extra material that can no longer be used.

Tips for Zero Waste Sewing

Tip #1: Ensure that you have the right measurement before you make your final cut.

Be cautious in doing your measurements.  Remember, once you make a cut on your fabric, it can no longer be undone.  Make sure that you only cut the fabric after you have the right measurements so as not to put any material into waste.

As the aphorism goes: ” Measure twice, cut once.”

Tip #2: Let patterns serve as your guide.

In sewing, patterns are your best friend.  From beginners to professionals we all work with them.  Following a well-designed pattern to the letter will ensure you have the least wastage possible. Cutting on the fly and deviating from the pattern can be a big risk and for most sewists, it’s simply not worth it.

 We are all aware that when the pattern of any fabric has been cut, it can no longer be used for bigger sizes. It would be best then to avoid either trimming and cutting the pieces of pattern on the material or choosing the biggest size to cut them.

Should you decide not to cut any part of the fabric, it is suggested to have the pattern paper folded in its edge or the part you need to cut or trace. This could take a lot of time and effort, so to make it more manageable, it would be best to have the pattern cut at its biggest size. For every piece you need to use, it would help if you try to fold each of the pieces at its edge to create smaller sizes.

Tips for Zero Waste Sewing

Tip #3: Piecing

Piecing was a very common method back when the cost of fabrics was very high. It is the process of breaking into smaller pieces a large piece of fabric to ensure that the parts not needed are not wasted.  It likewise involves the process of utilizing the smaller pieces of fabrics in such a way that you maximize the whole material itself since nothing is left for scrap. Piecing ensures that two portions of smaller fabrics are put together to come up with the pattern or shape you need. While piecing is not highly recommended for many kinds of garments, it is handy for projects not used as clothing or display, like lining.

Tip #4: Seam Allowances

Having a lot of scrap material that cannot be used is very common, especially for beginners.  This is because of the allowances created when trimming the fabric in an incorrect way.  As you learn the proper skills in sewing, you will be able to do the correct way of trimming your fabric so as to not leave a lot of unusable scraps.  You don’t need to become a professional sewer to maximize the use of your resources for sewing.  You will soon realize that the extra remaining edges may actually be used still by hand-sewing them.

Tip #5: Secondhand Fabric

Another helpful tip to save on your sewing fabric is to make use of fabrics from projects you have previously done are no longer used. Purchasing materials for smaller sewing projects from thrift stores is definitely a wise choice to make.

Tips #6: Fabric Stash

We are all aware that purchasing more than what you really need is not a good habit at all. This encourages you to be unaware of the materials put to waste since you have more than enough. Not because the fabrics are on sale, then you are pushed to stock up on them. It is wiser to make a plan for the kind of project you want to be sewn and shop only for those kinds of materials.

For some more ideas on organizing your fabric stash, have a read of this:

Tip #7: New Material

You must be very cautious in selecting the quality of the fabric needed for a new project. Take into consideration certain factors such as the fabric’s weave, care guidelines, elasticity, durability, design, and cost. While there may not be a perfect quality for fabric, what is significant is the manner it is produced. Although it may be challenging to select the best kind of fabric, you can pick the right fabric if you consider the purpose for using such fabric and that you handle with proper care the finished project you have come up from it.

Tip #8: Thread

Admit it, most of us are very conscious when choosing the right fabric but thinking about the thread is the very last thing in mind. Yes, it is expected to use the thread you already have than buying a new one. But giving special attention when choosing the kind of thread to use is as essential as selecting the best fabric for your project. Did you know that threads could contain polyesters (mostly in large amounts)? When disposed of, polyesters remain polyesters and will last for a longer period of time than threads with natural fiber. So for future purchases, be conscientious and choose a different fiber, which can be a great help for zero-waste sewing.

Tips #9: Scissors

You can never underestimate how a good pair of scissors can help you benefit from your sewing tasks. Your sewing scissors should be used solely for their purpose and must be taken care of properly to maintain their sharpness. A lot of sewing fabrics are wasted because of dull or poor-quality of scissors. Always choose the best one you can use for the long term.

Tip #10: Save your scraps

Whatever amount or size remains from your fabric, make sure that you have storage to keep them. You will never know when you might need a small piece of fabric, and you can save time and resources when you have your scraps in a single place. You may find it very helpful that these actually recycled materials combined with new materials can last for a valuable length of time. There are several ways to utilize recycled textiles depending on their sizes. Just use your creativity, and you can definitely save a lot.

Tips for Zero Waste Sewing
Fabric breaking down in a compost bin.

Tips #11: Composting

Disposal of old materials should be the last option. There are numerous types of textiles that decompose for as long as six months. This process can actually help our environment with the disposal of waste. You just need to clearly identify if the unused textiles you have can indeed be decomposed. If you are unsure, it is best not to proceed. However, you have to keep in mind that composting should always be your last resort.

Tip #12: Pins and Needles

Obviously, specific sewing materials, including pins and needles, cannot be recycled. In cases when they get broken or are impossible to be used, be careful to dispose of them properly. Never leave them attached to your scrapped or recycled fabrics and materials to avoid anybody from being hurt or having an accident.

I hope you enjoyed these essential tips for zero-waste sewing.  If you have more ideas on how to practice zero waste while sewing please make sure to leave them in the comments below for the other readers.


If You’d Like To Support Our Site

If you want to help us continue to bring you a wide selection of free sewing patterns and projects, please consider buying us a coffee.  We’d really, really appreciate it.




Source link

Salvage Your Selvages! | So Sew Easy

Salvage Your Selvages! | So Sew Easy


salvage your selvages

Now any seamstress or hobby sewist will undoubtedly have discarded that little white strip along the fabric edge without a second thought, probably a few hundred times or more. You know that “useless” strip where the manufacturer’s branding is printed…along with a few strange colored circles? Well, there’s more to it than just branding! That printing along the fabric edge is known as the fabric selvage marking and, together with keeping the fabric from fraying or unraveling, it actually contains more useful info than you’d previously imagined.

What’s in a name?

Before you learn the secrets of the strip: how about that weird name?! Well, the name selvage or selvedge originated from the term self-edge, meaning a self-finished edge of the fabric. You will find that the specific weave in the selvage strip stops it from fraying entirely. It is “self-edged”.

salvage your selvages

The colored circles (or whatever other shape the manufacturer uses) contained in the selvage strip offer a wealth of guidance when it comes to color matching of fabrics for a larger project and, when placed alongside each other, the selvage markings of two different fabrics can tell you whether or not the fabrics really match, color-wise.

For example…should you be looking for a solid color match for a complex and colorful print, the selvage dots will allow you to tell whether or not your eyes are deceiving you as we often lose perspective of individual tones when a print is complex and color-rich. When dealing with two complex prints, matching more than two of the circles in each fabric up should tell you whether or not the fabrics will complement each other.

salvage your selvages

What’s even more exciting about the selvage strip is this: once you’ve used it to help you pick out colors for your project…save it! There is actually what I can only call a movement of sentimental sewists, quilters in particular, out there who religiously save their selvage strips. You’ll be inspired and utterly amazed once you’ve had a look at what some of these artists have done with their collections!

Plus, it’s not only because the sturdy, un-fraying weave makes for great pincushions, pencil pouches, and seat-covers, it’s also because there, on whatever you chose to construct out of your saved up selvage strips, stands a history of the brands you’ve used and your choices and experience of every project you’ve undertaken since you started selvage-saving! In the end, you can produce an item that’s bright and detailed, a color-coded history book telling the tale of all your hard work in front of the machine! One thing’s for sure: undertaking a selvage project of your own is bound to be a rewarding and sentimental experience!

salvage your selvages

The wide variety of fonts, colors, and patterns used in different selvage strips make for incredible detail and what’s more…no one’s item, even if they use your selvage pattern, will look remotely the same.

When sewing together strips for your project, consider this: the cut edge of the selvage won’t fray…instead, it may well create ribbons of the most adorable fluff, adding even more texture and detail to your piece. Keep about an inch of the actual fabric attached to your strip (to play around with) when you trim it off the main fabric. Use topstitching to sew your strips together: just within the finished edge.

RFID shielded handbag

You may not have noticed it in the project pictures, but I made the handles of the Gleam, RFID Shielded Handbag from the selvages of the Marimekko fabric I used for the bag.  If you look closely, you’ll see the markings.  I used the technique detailed in the tutorial and video about Making Bag Handles from Twisted Fabric Scraps to make the handles.

Not only were these handles very strong because of the more robust nature of the selvages, but the subtle display of a brand like Marimekko was fantastic.  So many people have asked me about it and assumed the bag was a designer item.  And all this with something sewists would often just throw away!

salvage your selvages

So Salvage your Selvages!

I’m pretty sure this has given you a little bit to think about, a little colored, printed strip to think about…happy sewing and happy selvage salvaging!

What sort of things have you made using selvages?  Please share your ideas with us in the comments below.


If You’d Like To Support Our Site

If you want to help us continue to bring you a wide selection of free sewing patterns and projects, please consider buying us a coffee.  We’d really, really appreciate it.




Source link

What Basic Sewing Machine Embroidery Stitches Can You Find On Your Machine?

What Basic Sewing Machine Embroidery Stitches Can You Find On Your Machine?


What basic sewing machine embroidery stitches can you find already on your machine?  In some machines, these types of stitches are also known as decorative stitches.  Most machines come with a series of these stitches, on my machine I’m fortunate to have many more than I thought.

I am the proud owner of a Bernina 350 patchwork Edition, a product that is no longer available as I just found out today as I am writing this post.  Am I going to be buying a newer model?  The tingle and excitement of a new sewing machine are beginning to brew in my mind.  It has been two years since I got my Bernina 350, and I think the honeymoon is over. 

But, do I really know my sewing machine? Today I took a random look at the stitching card and I realized I have never taken the time to see how the stitches look in real life.  In fact, the protective plastic film was still attached to it, that’s how little I’ve used it.

 basic sewing machine embroidery stitches

The film is still on the display screen as well, and frankly, I feel a little ashamed… How could I even think of getting a new machine if mine still has not even been unwrapped properly?

This reminds me of people in my country who drive their car for months with the factory plastic covers still stuck onto their seats so that the car will look just a little newer for a longer time. In my case, it is pure neglect. I have been very busy these the last two years.

 basic sewing machine embroidery stitches
 basic sewing machine embroidery stitches

So what basic sewing machine embroidery stitches are actually in my machine?

I found a total of 85 basic sewing machine embroidery stitches. Some of them are so beautiful my mind started racing to come up with many different ways to use them.

Fabric borders are perhaps the best way to use this stitches.

 basic sewing machine embroidery stitches

Repeating a pattern in rows can even change the texture and look of a fabric creating a unique fabric print.

Here I’ve done them on a contrasting color so you can see the different basic sewing machine embroidery stitches this Bernina has.

 basic sewing machine embroidery stitches

I have to say I am surprised that this little machine has so many stitches, the possibilities are endless.

The question now is: Do I really need a new sewing machine?

No, I do not need another sewing machine, (sadly..) This Bernina has everything I need from a basic sewing machine. Sure the embroidery stitches cannot be made bigger, but for making borders and decorations they are perfect. I am still amazed that after so many years of sewing, and so many machines later, that this is the first time that I’ve really explored this function fully on my machine. Have you checked yours yet?

New to sewing? Please check the most basic sewing stitches here.

 basic sewing machine embroidery stitches

Join me next time when we’ll be exploring the subject a bit further, combining stitches and other materials to make borders for your fabric. 

In the comments below, let me know how many stitches can you find on your sewing machine and if you have had a chance to use them. Until next time, Happy Sewing!


If You’d Like To Support Our Site

If you want to help us continue to bring you a wide selection of free sewing patterns and projects, please consider buying us a coffee.  We’d really, really appreciate it.




Source link

The Placket Pattern & Tutorial – For The Tailored Shirt Look

The Placket Pattern & Tutorial – For The Tailored Shirt Look


placket pattern

This is the placket pattern & tutorial.  A placket is a detail often used in tailored shirts and blouses. This is one of the skills that will raise your sewing to the next level.

But first, let’s make sure everyone knows what we’re talking about.  According to Wikipedia:

placket (also spelled placquet) is an opening in the upper part of trousers or skirts, or at the neck or sleeve of a garment.[1] Plackets are almost always used to allow clothing to be put on or removed easily, but are sometimes used purely as a design element. Modern plackets often contain fabric facings or attached bands to surround and reinforce fasteners such as buttons, snaps, or zippers.

Yes, I think you know where I am going with this placket pattern & tutorial.  I just love these super simple techniques that make your projects look much more professional.  I have found the absolute easiest way to make a tailored placket for the crisp looking shirt that I will soon share with you.

You can use this placket pattern in just about any sleeve you wish to have buttons and cuffs.  A placket is always found in a tailored shirt of man and woman, but it is a bit tricky to sew so I am sharing with you an easy and fail-proof way.  While most sleeves patterns come with their placket pattern, you can use the pattern I am sharing with you in case you want to add a placket to a shirt you already have.

Materials

  • Fabric from the shirt or a contrasting one.
  • An erasable pen, or tailor’s chalk
  • An iron
  • A ruler

Pattern Download

Get the Pattern HERE

Once printed, transfer the placket pattern to your fabric using a tailor’s chalk, pencil or an erasable ink pen.  You might want to try a Frixion pen.

There are two pieces to the pattern:  The Overlap and the Underlap.  Place the fabric print sides together and cut out two pieces, two for each sleeve.  We will start folding the pieces, this is an important step so we do not sew the pieces on the wrong side of the sleeve.

How To Use This Placket Pattern Tutorial

This is the contemporary drafting and sewing technique of a placket pattern & tutorial for a man’s or woman’s shirt.  There are other ways to sew a placket but I have given you the universally know tailoring technique.

Note: this is not a mass-produced technique used in large factories.

Step One:  Preparing The Overlap

Fold the Overlap print sides together and

placket pattern

sew the edge at 1/4″ (A), trim the corner at a 90-degree angle (B),  Trim (C) and turn sharp triangle.

placket pattern

Turn the triangle right side out (D). Iron.placket pattern

Fold the 3/8″ line on the side where the triangle is located.

placket pattern

placket pattern

Fold the 1/4″ line on the opposite side of the triangle.placket pattern

placket pattern

placket pattern

The following pictures are going to be key to making the placket on the right side of the sleeve and in the correct order.

placket pattern

placket pattern

Step Two:  Preparing The Underlap

placket pattern

Fold 1/4″ on the side.

placket pattern

Then fold in both sides on the sides. placket pattern

You will use the creases as a sewing guide to attaching the underlap to the sleeve.

placket pattern

Here are both pieces of the pattern.  Overlap on top and Underlap at the bottom.

placket pattern

Step Three:  Placing The Pieces Of The Placket On The Sleeve

It is important to pay attention to this step since it will make or break your project.   Placing the pieces in the correct placement will ensure your success.

The Overlap is placed print side down on the wide side of the placement line or towards the front of the sleeve.placket pattern

placket pattern

Align the edges of the Underlap and Overlap on the placement line

placket pattern

Using the fold lines already made by the iron sew on each line next to the placement line stopping right at the end of the placket.

placket pattern

placket pattern

Cut in between the stitching lines or on the placement line.  Stop at 1/4″ and cut to the corner but not through.

placket pattern

placket patternStep Four:  Sewing The Underlap

Bring the Underlap from the wrong side of the sleeve to the right side and iron the stitching line.

placket pattern

Pin the Underlap over the stitching line and sew. Iron.

placket pattern

Step Five:  Sewing The Overlap

Turn the Overlap to the right side of the sleeve and iron the stitching line.

placket pattern

Fold the Overlap over the stitching line. You will find that the Overlap will do this naturally since it was folded previously using the iron.

placket pattern

Stitch close to the folded edge from 3/8″ of the Jog level to the end of the Overlap.

placket pattern

placket pattern

Now it is time to sew the Overlap Over the Underlap.

  1. Keeping the Underlap away from the Overlap sew the edge at 1/16″ from the end of the overlap to the first corner.placket pattern
  2. Slide the Underlap under the Overlap and sew from the corner to the tipplacket pattern
  3. From the tip to the left corner
  4. From the left corner join the stitching line with the previously stitched line.placket pattern
  5. Sew across the packet and create a rectangle catching this way the Underlap and the Overlap, you are now ready to sew the underarm stitch.placket pattern

Most of the commercial and Indy Patterns will include a placket pattern but not always a detailed step-by-step tutorial on how to make one.  The Placket is a contemporary tailoring technique that is both feared and respected by fashion design students and newbie seamstresses alike.

This is one of the techniques that will move you from a beginner to intermediate-level sewists.  Take up the challenge and learn this technique so you can join me in making a special, tailored blouse coming soon.

placket pattern

placket pattern

Let me know what you think of this Placket tutorial in the comments below, also if you want to see more interesting techniques to take your sewing projects to the next level.

 


If You’d Like To Support Our Site

If you want to help us continue to bring you a wide selection of free sewing patterns and projects, please consider buying us a coffee.  We’d really, really appreciate it.




Source link

An Intimate Look at Maternity Fashion

An Intimate Look at Maternity Fashion


maternity fashion

In the Middle Ages, a mere apron was considered as a maternity dress.  It was simply used to cover up because pregnant women’s dresses of the day did not fit around the belly anymore.  And this was maternity fashion for centuries. Fortunately, mothers-to-be today have more options to choose from as maternity fashion has evolved significantly.   If your next sewing project happens to be maternity wear, here is an intimate look at maternity fashion to inspire you.

Maternity Fashion in the 14th Century

Before the 14th century, pregnant women made do with their everyday clothes.  Dresses did not follow the female form at the time.  With no seams and just flowing fabrics, women’s dresses could comfortably be worn by pregnant ladies. It was only in the 14th century when women began to wear clothes that hugged their curves to reveal more of their feminine features.  This was the era when seams were let out to allow the growth of the baby bumps and paved the way for the evolution of actual maternity fashion.

The Adrienne Dress of the Baroque and Georgian Period

The first recorded maternity wear surfaced during the Baroque period between the years 1600 and 1750. Characterized by voluminous folds and flowing fabrics, the Adrienne dress expanded with the growing bellies. Some women also wore men’s waistcoats that allowed them to adjust the size of the coat through laced vents in the back. From 1714 through 1811, maternity clothes became more practical when bibs were added at the bust line of the Adrienne dress to allow for breastfeeding.

maternity fashion
MarkauMark / Shutterstock.com

The Glamorous 1950’s & 60’s

The ’50s and ’60s are often known as the glamorous years when Hollywood reached the peak of its golden years. This was the time when some women were sometimes said to be doing house chores in pencil skirts and pearls. The swinging ’60s saw the replacement of the smock dress with miniskirts but pregnant women are still not wont to show their growing figures.

Those glamorous years saw a pregnant Princess of Grace of Monaco wearing an embroidered bell-style tent coat showing her distinct blend of glamour and poise. And when Breakfast at Tiffany’s iconic actress Audrey Hepburn was expecting her son, she wore a classic white dress that hid her bump, looking fabulous with a simple string of pearls to match.

maternity fashion
neftali / Shutterstock.com

The Maternity Fashion of the 1970s & 80’s

The fashion of the ’70s & ’80s with its big flares and big shoulder pads unfortunately did not include maternity wear. Pregnant women wore big shapeless tent dresses and they were still covered up. Brightly colored smock dresses dominated the maternity fashion during this time and Princess Diana of Wales is probably the most photographed pregnant woman of the era.

maternity fashion
Featureflash Photo Agency / Shutterstock.com

The Blossoming of Maternity Fashion in the 90’s and Beyond

When Demi Moore bared her bump on the cover of Vanity Fair in the 1990s, many people realized that the pregnant body is beautiful and pregnant women started wearing stylish dresses to show it. This is especially true with pregnant celebrities who set the trend of maternity fashion under the watchful eye of the paparazzi. With the media interest in celebrity pregnancies increasing, maternity fashion blossomed. Katie Holmes, Angelina Jolie, and the Duchess of Cambridge are just a few of the celebrities who helped set the trend.

Today, fashion designers are creating maternity clothes as more pregnant women want to look chic and feel comfortable at the same time. High-end denim brands like Rock & Republic and Citizens of Humanity are selling their own maternity lines. Other famous brands like Juicy Couture, Gap, and Old Navy also came up with stylish tops, wrap dresses, plunging V-necks, and gowns that were worn not only by famous pregnant moms-to-be.

maternity fashion

The days of hiding the baby bump is definitely over and pregnant ladies can now choose from an array of different styles as maternity fashion continues to diversify. You can create maternity shorts and trousers for a day out on a beautiful sunny day or go for that little black dress that can make you feel elegant during your pregnancy.

Indeed, being pregnant nowadays should not get in the way of your own personal style. From chic casuals to glamorous maternity dresses, the choice is yours because maternity fashion has indeed come a long, long way!

If you’d be interested in seeing some patterns here involving maternity fashion, please let me know in the comments below.  If interest is good, we can certainly pull some practical, beautiful, and easy-to-sew designs together.


If You’d Like To Support Our Site

If you want to help us continue to bring you a wide selection of free sewing patterns and projects, please consider buying us a coffee.  We’d really, really appreciate it.




Source link